Finder’s Consumer Confidence Index | Finder.com


Finder’s Consumer Confidence Index is a quarterly survey of US consumer attitudes and trends on the topics of wealth, debt, savings, work satisfaction and overall confidence in the economy. The index is a nationally representative study of the American public designed Finder and conducted by Qualtrics.

This is the first round of our index, which so far covers a sample of 2,112 American adults and is growing by roughly 2,000 respondents each quarter. On this page is a small selection of the insights we’re compiling from our sample.

If you’re a journalist or researcher who would like discuss these findings with an expert, please get in touch with Chelsea Wells-Barrett in PR, media relations and communications at uspr@finder.com

Wealth and debt 💰 💸

We look at the personal and household income, savings and property ownership of the average American household.

Key facts

  • The average American is saving $462 a month and has roughly $24,872 in savings.
  • Men ($667) are saving at a rate more than double that of women ($282).
  • Gen Z are the biggest savers among generations, squirreling away $857 a month.
  • Men ($82,681) have roughly 3.5 times as much in savings as women ($23,663).
  • The average grocery bill is $195 a week.
  • Men spend $220 a week on groceries compared to $173 spent by women.
  • Gen Z spend the most on groceries at $290 a week.
  • 78% of Americans say the US will enter a recession in the next 12 months.
  • 64% say inflation has affected their saving and spending habits.
  • One in five (21%) say they couldn’t live off their savings for more than a week.
  • Close to half (46%) don’t think they’d make it a month on their savings.
  • Average credit card debt is $3,380
  • More than a quarter (28%) of American adults say they couldn’t manage their budget without a credit card.
  • A third of women couldn’t manage their finances without a credit card
  • Almost half (47%) of credit card holders say they pay off their balances every month.
  • Almost a quarter (24%) of people with credit card debt say it’ll take a minimum of a year to pay off their debt.
  • Men (56%) are more likely to clear their balances every month than women (39%).
  • Baby boomers are the best at paying off their debt, with roughly two-thirds (66%) clearing their cards each month.
  • Women ($4,393) are carrying roughly twice as much debt as men ($2,272).
  • Gen X carries the most debt among generations at $4,771.

What is your personal and household income?

Close to a third of women (30%) surveyed say they earn at or less than the median personal income of $41,535. Roughly 17% of men said the same.

Average savings account balance

The average American says that they have $24,872 in their savings account. Men have roughly $10,000 more in savings than women, while boomers have at least 5 times more in savings than any other generation.

The average American says that they put $462 into their savings account per month. Men put away almost twice as much as women per month. Gen Z are the biggest savers.

The average weekly grocery bill comes in at $195, with men ($220) spending slightly more than women ($173). Gen Z are the biggest spenders among generations at $290.

The average adult is carrying $3,380 in credit card debt. Women ($4,393) are racking up debt at almost twice the rate of men ($2,272), and Gen X is carrying the most debt among on their credit cards among generations at $4,771. Despite what you’ve heard about the entitlement of millennials and Gen Z, more than half of Gen Y (52%) and Gen Z (59%) say they’re satisfied with their pay.

Work-life 🛠️ 🧘‍♀️

We look at salary satisfaction, increases and expectations — and who’s on the move.

Key facts

  • More than half (55%) of Gen Z said they left a job in the last 12 months.
  • 55% of American adults think they’re going to get a salary increase in the coming 12 months.
  • Men (59%) are more likely than women (50%) to say they’ll be getting a raise.
  • 68% of Gen Z think a raise is on the horizon in the next 12 months.
  • 60% of those in the Northeast say they’ll get a raise in the next 12 months.
  • The average American is expecting a raise of about 16%.
  • Men expect their next raise to be 19%, with women expecting a raise of just 12%.
  • Among generations, Gen Z (20%) and Gen Y (19%) expect the biggest increases.
  • More than half of those surveyed (52%) say they’re unhappy with their current income.
  • Almost two-thirds of women (63%) say they’re unhappy with their salary, compared to 42% of men.
  • 65% of Gen X say they’re unsatisfied with their current salary.
  • While Gen Z is the generation most likely to expect a raise and by the biggest amount, they’re also the generation most happy within their current salary — with 59% saying they’re satisfied with their income.

Roughly a quarter (26%) of those surveyed left a job in the last 12 months, with the two main reasons being finding a new job (11%) and taking a career break (7%).

55% of those surveyed say they expect to get a salary increase in the next 12 months.

Of those that said they expect a raise, the average American expects a raise of 16%. Men expect a raise of 19%, far higher than the 12% women say they’ll be getting, while Gen Z (20%) and Gen Y (19%) have the highest expectations among generations.

More than half (52%) of adults surveyed say they’re not happy with their current salary. However, men (58%) are more likely than women (37%) to be satisfied with their current remuneration.

Housing 🏡

We break down where Americans live and who with, how much we’re paying, renting versus owning and the outlook on the future of housing.

Key facts

  • 57% of respondents say they own their primary residence, while 38% say they rent.
  • Men (61%) are more likely to own a home than women (55%).
  • Women (41%) are more likely to be renters than men (35%).
  • 81% of boomers say they own their primary residence.
  • 53% of Gen Z say they rent.
  • 9% of renters own a property they’re not living in.
  • Men (15%) who rent are far more likely to own a property than women (4%).
  • Single-family detached houses are the most common type of property owned by American adults (76%).
  • The average mortgage is $904 a month.
  • Men ($980) pay more than women ($827) for mortgages.
  • Gen Z pay the highest mortgage ($1,321) among the generations.
  • The average rent is $1,235 a month.
  • Men ($1,492) pay more than women ($1,036) in rent.
  • Gen Z pays the most in rent ($1,678) among the generations.
  • One in 5 (22%) say they struggle to pay their home loan.
  • Gen Z (37%) and Gen Y (36%) struggle to pay their home loans.
  • Almost half (49%) of people say they’re struggling to pay the rent.
  • Women (55%) are more likely than men (42%) to say they’re struggling to pay rent.
  • Only 17% of those surveyed say that now is a good time to buy a home.
  • A third (33%) say they expect home prices to somewhat increase in their local area over the next year.
  • Over half see prices rising in the coming year.
  • 13% of households say they have a parent living with them rent-free.
  • A quarter of households have a romantic partner living with them rent-free.

Some 57% of respondents say they own their primary residence, with 38% saying they rent and the remainder selecting other. Men (61%) are slightly more likely than women to say they own their primary residence, while baby boomers (81%) are more than twice as likely as Gen Z (38%) to say they own their home.

The average monthly mortgage sits at $904. Men ($980) pay about 15% more than women ($827), while younger generations like Gen Z and Gen Y have higher mortgage payments than older generations.

The average monthly rent is $1,235. Men ($1,492) pay a considerable amount more on average for rent each month than women ($1,036). Gen Z say they are shelling out $1,678 a month in rent.

Roughly half (49%) of those leasing a property say they struggle to pay rent, compared to just 22% of those who have a mortgage.

Economic confidence 🏦

We break down Americans’ general sentiment toward their household finances and how they feel about the future of their finances.

Key facts

  • 89% of Americans are worried about the cost of groceries.
  • 30% are extremely concerned about the cost of gas.
  • 26% are very concerned about the cost of energy.
  • 23% are moderately concerned about rising household bills.
  • 17% are slightly concerned about household bills and healthcare costs.
  • The cost of college is of least concern, with 24% saying they’re not concerned at all.
  • Just 15% of people said they’re not stressed about their financial situation.
  • Men (20%) are roughly twice as likely as women (11%) to say they’re not stressed.
  • 34% of baby boomers say they’re not stressed about their finance.
  • 42% of people say their finances are worse off than they were a year ago.
  • Almost half of women (47%) say their finances are worse now than they were a year ago, compare to 37% of men.
  • 52% of Gen X say their financial situation has worsened in the last year.

For all media inquiries, please contact:

Chelsea Wells-Barrett, PR, Media Relations and Communications

E: uspr@finder.com

/CWellsbarrett/

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